Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States

Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States

This first-ever fully annotated edition of one of the most read memoirs in the world is a sheer delight for Civil War buffs.

One can enjoy the memoirs without knowing the precise definition of a nautical term, or what it signifies that a particular land mass or body of water was chosen, or the rules of engagement, but readers of Raphael Semmes‘ Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States will find that these kinds of details add immeasurably to understanding and enjoying the details written by Admiral Semmes.

Here is the complete text of Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States with more than 300 annotations including:

Explanations of historical context

Details of the time and place in which Admiral Semmes’ situations occur, giving details that enable the reader to interpret and analyze the events in the work.

Definitions and clarifications

Nautical words, words still in use whose meanings have changed, and obscure passages are explained.

Literary comments and analyses

Insightful analysis and reflection highlight Semme’s actions as a mariner and point out the ways he commanded his ship and crew.

Maps and illustrations

Of places and objects mentioned in the memoir.

Of course, one can enjoy the memoirs without knowing the precise definition of a nautical term, or what it signifies that a particular land mass or body of water was chosen, or the rules of engagement, but readers Raphael Semmes‘ Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States will find that these kinds of details add immeasurably to understanding and enjoying the details written by Admiral Semmes.

Annotations and other enhancements
Copyright © 2020 Terry W. Platt

Commodore Ebenezer Farrand, C.S.N.

One of the first commanders appointed to the Confederate Navy. Responsible for selecting construction sites for Confederate warships along the Alabama River. This included the construction of the C.S.S. Nashville at Montgomery and of another ship at Selma. Assumed command of the Mobile Squadron following the capture of Admiral Buchanan during the Battle of Mobile Bay. Farrand’s squadron of gunboats supported the Confederate Army at Spanish Fort and Fort Blakely in the spring of 1865. After retiring up the Tombigbee River, Farrand surrendered his squadron to Union forces on May 8, 1865. Source: Luraghi, Raimondo. A History of the Confederate Navy. Annapolis, Md.: U.S. Naval Institute Press, 1996.